MIXTAPE: EIGHT DAYS A WEEK 0

Another week, another mixtape. Mark your calendars as Chris Rooney takes you on a musical journey through the seven days of the week right through the weekend.

The Bolshoi, “Sunday Morning” (1986)
Growing up it was either sleep in late or off to church bright and early Sunday morning. By the look of things, someone still has a grudge with their strict religious upbringing and doesn’t want to revisit those Sunday mornings.

Morrissey, “Everyday Is Like Sunday” (1988)
Boredom naturally comes on a Sunday when everything is closed, stuck at seasonal destination when its off-season or simply growing up in a small town with no vitality left in it. Etch a postcard, “How I dearly wish I was not here”. In many American states, Sunday blue laws still exist that prohibit businesses such as car dealerships from being open, abstain alcohol sales, bar horse racing and prevent hunting because of lingering puritan beliefs. At least Morrissey can get behind that ban on hunting.

U2, “Sunday Bloody Sunday” (1983)
U2’s overtly political, yet nonpartisan, protest song reflects upon Sunday, January 30, 1972 when British troops fired upon Northern Irish unarmed civilians, killing 14. Other musicians such as Paul McCartney, John Lennon, Black Sabbath and Stiff Little Fingers all wrote songs in response to the events of that day prior to U2’s concert anthem.

New Order, “Blue Monday” (1983)
How does it feel to be treated like this on the first day of the work week? Bernard Sumner lackadaisical delivery sums it up perfectly what it is like to start a Monday morning.

The Bangles, “Manic Monday” (1986)
You’re not fooling us Prince penning The Bangles’ breakthrough hit under the name “Christopher”. We know all about the period of time when you were the artist formerly known as Prince using that unpronounceable symbol, but surely “Christopher” is your 9-to-5 worker bee alter ego who has a regular desk job and run-of-the-mill worries like the rest of us.

Boomtown Rats, “I Don’t Like Mondays” (1979)
Why so much disdain for this day in particular? Five years later after wanting to shoot the whole day down, Bob Geldof must gotten over it as he chose to release his big musical creation, “Do They Know It’s Christmas?” on a Monday.

Duran Duran, “New Moon on Monday” (1984)
Monday is almost over and the nighttime darkness is the ideal cover for the boys of Duran Duran to stage an underground rebellion (complete with lit torches and perfectly coiffed hair) on a society run by an oppressive militaristic regime.

‘Til Tuesday, “Voices Carry” (1985)
Ah, quiet little Tuesday. Never drawing attention to itself stuck between the beginning and the middle of the work week until ‘Til Tuesday’s Aimee Mann just couldn’t take it anymore of her douchebag boyfriend and stood up for herself during the most opportune moment at Carnegie Hall. Makes you think that she was holding out for the great acoustics to make her point and dump the a-hole.

Fisherspooner, “Wednesday” (2005)
It’s Hump Day and here to ride that cresting wave in the week is Fisherspooner’s sexy electroclash single that combines a ‘80s new wave sound influenced by Gary Numan, Kraftwerk and early Pet Shop Boys with modern electronica.

Pet Shop Boys, “Thursday” (2013)
Despite having to the chance to coordinate the release their 54th (yes, 54th!) single on the same day that the song references, The Pet Shop Boys chose instead to debut it on a Monday.

David Bowie, “Thursday’s Child” (1999)
“Thursday’s Child has far to go”, so says the 19th century nursery rhyme that is supposed to tell a child’s character or future based on the day he or she was born. Bowie, in case you were wondering, was born on a Wednesday.

The Cure, “Friday I’m In Love” (1992)
Disheveled hair, badly applied lipstick and untied high-top sneakers can mean only one thing – it’s Casual Friday for Robert Smith!

The Specials, “Friday Night, Saturday Morning” (1981)
Forget the oh-so-pleasant expression “Thank God It’s Friday”. The Brits and the Aussies have a term for the last day of the workday that tops that by a mile – POETS Day, which stands for “Piss Off Early, Tomorrow’s Saturday”. The Specials’ weekend ritual encapsulates that vibe to a tee with lines like “Out of bed at eight am / Out my head by half past ten / Out with mates and dates and friends / That’s what I do at weekends / I can’t talk and I can’t walk / But I know where I’m going to go / I’m going watch my money go / At the Locarno, no”.

David Bowie, “Drive-In Saturday” (1973)
It seems like Saturdays were more wild and crazy in the 1970s compared to the 1980s. Think about it. You had the birth of Saturday Night Live, the blockbuster Saturday Night Fever igniting the disco craze, Elton John sang “Saturday Night’s Alright for Fighting” and the tartan teen sensations, The Bay City Rollers were shouting out, “S-A-T-U-R-D-A-Y Night!”

The Cure, “10:15 Saturday Night” (1979)
It’s damn near impossible to get a plumber late on a Saturday night, much less all-day Sunday if your kitchen sink tap drips drip, drip, drip, drip, drip, drip, drip, drip. Better luck ringing him up on Monday.

Étienne Daho “Week-end à Rome” (1984)
The French, including their very own pop star Étienne Daho, have a thing about not messing with their culture and language. Yet they have adopted the English word, “weekend”, by adding a little French twist with a hyphen in the middle. In the 1990s, the English electronic pop group Saint Etienne teamed up with Daho and had one of their biggest hits with a reworked English version of the song called “He’s On The Phone”.

Lloyd Cole & Commotions, “Lost Weekend” (1985)
True story. I’m on my honeymoon seeing the sights of Europe and I caught the worst cold possible. The last few days we spent in Amsterdam. I’m relaxing in our hotel room trying to feel better when I suddenly hear Lloyd Cole singing on the TV, “…it took a lost weekend in a hotel in Amsterdam, double pnuemonia in a single room and the sickest joke was the price of the medicine…”

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St. Paddy’s Day MIXTAPE 2: LITTLE POTS O’ “GOLD”! 0

Gold! Always believe in your soul!

From the gold lamé suit worn by ABC’s Martin Fry to the bleached golden locks of Blondie’s Deborah Harry, the new wave era has always had the Midas touch. Follow Chris Rooney’s rainbow of songs to the very end to find your very own pot of gold standards. (To listen to this or any of our other playlists via Spotify, click here.)

 

 

Spandau Ballet, “Gold” (1983)
Spandau frontman Tony Hadley’s recent thoughts on the tune: “’Gold’ is the song which even today’s kids enjoy singing along to in student bars up and down the country, and is one of main reasons I get so many corporate shows. It’s requested all the time at awards shows.” Ironically, the single only achieved Silver in the UK, unlike their previous single, “True,” which attained Gold status with sales of over 400,000 units.

 

The Human League, “(You Remind Me Of) Gold” (1982)
If Philip Oakey was resistant about releasing “Don’t You Want Me” as a single, he probably later kicked himself for relegating this synthpop gem to second fiddle as the B-side of the Human League’s single, “Mirror Man.”

 

Marian Gold of Alphaville, “Sounds Like A Melody” (1984)
Born Hartwig Schierbaum, the Alphaville frontman changed his name to Marian Gold. Perhaps he was inspired by another singer with a big, operatic voice and a stage name taken from another element in the periodic table – Queen’s Freddie Mercury?

 

The Stranglers, “Golden Brown” (1982)
If you were concocting the perfect playlist for a heroin addict, The Stranglers’ hypnotic waltz would lay strung out well between the Velvet Underground’s  “I’m Waiting for the Man” and The Las’ “There She Goes.”

 

Simple Minds, “New Gold Dream (81-82-83-84)” (1982)
“Every band or artist with a history has an album that’s their holy grail,” said vocalist Jim Kerr. “I suppose New Gold Dream was ours. It was a special time because we were really beginning to break through with that record, both commercially and critically. The people that liked that record connected with it in a special way. There was a depth to it: it created its own mythology. It stood out. It was our most successful record to date and, critically, the (music journalist) Paul Morleys of this world were writing very nice things about it.”

 

David Bowie, “Golden Years” (1975)
Bowie allegedly offered the song to Elvis Presley to perform, but that Presley declined it. Ironically, Bowie can still enjoy the song in his golden years unlike Elvis who died two years later. Want to bet that probably only second to The Beatles’ “When I’m Sixty-Four,” this song has played at more AARP conventions than any other?

 

Golden Earring, “Twilight Zone” (1982)
The Dutch band had been kicking around since their inception in the mid-1960s with some minor success until they finally struck gold in the America thanks to their cinematic video played endlessly on the fledgling music channel, MTV. Interestingly enough, the song was inspired not by the famous TV series of the same name, but by the Robert Ludlum novel The Bourne Identity, which would later be turned into a popular movie twenty years later.

 

Annie Golden, “Hang Up the Phone” (1984)
Former lead singer of the power pop band and CBGB regulars, The Shirts, Golden went solo for this oh-so-1980s-poppy song used on the Sixteen Candles soundtrack.

 

The Smiths, “Golden Lights” (1986)
Ah, the pitfalls of fame and the ones you leave behind. Originally written and sung by the melancholic teenage singer, Twinkle back in 1964; “Golden Lights” is only one of two covers that The Smiths ever recorded in the studio. The other was a cover of a Cilla Black song, “Work Is A Four-Letter Word” which Morrissey insisted upon and is what supposedly was the straw that broke the camel’s back when Johnny Marr decided to quit the band in 1987.

 

Yello, “Goldrush” (1986)
There are two mysteries behind Yello’s music video for “Goldrush”. First, is everyone clamoring for an actual nugget of gold in his pocket or is it something more euphoric like a pocketful of poppers? The lyrics ”You’ve got that nugget in your hand..clouds, love, stars colours…rush” would certainly suggest so. And second, why doesn’t Billy MacKenzie from The Associates make a guest appearance since he’s singing the chorus? William, it was really nothing.

 

Aztec Camera, “Just Like Gold” (1981)
The debut single by Roddy Frame and the boys shimmers and shines with its jangly guitar work and jazzy drumming. Frame’s quest for more gold came with the band’s 1988 single, “Working In A Goldmine”. No wonder the invading Spanish conquistadors were so interested in fortunes of the Aztec Empire.

 

Johnny Hates Jazz, “Heart of Gold” (1988)
Johnny may have hated jazz, but he always loved a hooker with a heart of gold. I get the feeling that with Johnny’s luck, it will end with “Shattered Dreams” and a case of venereal disease.

 

Siouxsie & The Banshees, “Ornaments of Gold” (1988)
Siouxsie’s exquisite, exotic teaser invites you to a hedonistic world of “silver couches to recline upon / and ornaments of gold / silver moonbeams dance in fountains / below shining citadels”. Nothing is too good for Siouxsie.

 

The Stone Roses, “Fool’s Gold” (1989)
As the 1980s drew to a close, new wave was in the rear-view mirror. After The Smiths’ demise in 1987, the British music press was on the hunt to rave about the next big indie sensation. Lurking in the shadows were The Smiths’ fellow Mancunians, The Stone Roses. The band’s breakthrough came in 1989 with “Fool’s Gold”, their epic ode to pyrite.
This helped to set off the gold rush-like frenzy known as Madchester, the new decade’s short-lived Northern England music scene that mixed alternative rock, psychedelic rock and electronic dance music.

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MIXTAPE: HER NAME IS…. 0

We may not be as worldly as Duran Duran’s Simon LeBon traveling to exotic locations to meet women with names like ‘Rio’, but we searched deep in our record bins for new wave songs named after women. Accompanying each girly song on this mixtape is the ranking the song’s namesake placed in Social Security card applications for American female births during the 1980s. Guest audiophile Chris Rooney is hoping there is a 20-something named Sheila out there today whose folks conceived her while listening to Morrissey deliver the lines, “Sheila take a, Sheila take a bow / Boot the grime of this world in the crotch, dear…”

Eurythmics, ”Jennifer” (1983)
Baby Name Popularity: #2

Siouxsie & The Banshees, “Christine” (1980)
Baby Name Popularity: #45

The Undertones, “Julie Ocean” (1981)
Baby Name Popularity: #51

Elvis Costello, twins “Alison” (1977) & “Veronica” (1989)
Name Popularity: #107 (Alison) & #70 (Veronica)

Tom Tom Club, “Lorelei” (1981)
Baby Name Popularity: #143 (Lori)

The Modernettes, “Barbra” (1980)
Baby Name Popularity:  #155

The Knack, ”My Sharona” (1979)
Baby Name Popularity: #169 (Sharon)

U2, “Gloria” (1981)
Baby Name Popularity: #247

The Beat, “Jeanette” (1982)
Baby Name popularity: #257

The Smiths, “Sheila Take A Bow” (1987)
Baby Name Popularity: #269

The Cure, “Charlotte Sometimes” (1981)
Baby Name Popularity: #299

OMD, “Joan of Arc” (1981)
Baby Name Popularity:  #591

Sisters of Mercy, “Marian” (1985)

Baby Name Popularity: #595

Human League, “Louise” (1984)
Baby Name Popularity: #859

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